Current Affairs

Current Affairs · 26. April 2020
Do open borders work? Today we debunk one of the more common modern myths that closed borders are better. We take a look at the century long success story of the Swiss border.

Current Affairs · 15. February 2020
'Everyone has a right to a fair defence', but white-collar criminals never see the inside of a courtroom

Current Affairs · 23. December 2019
Political correctness is contentious – it was meant to be that way. It was a lousy right-wing media stitch-up to disparage the left and mask political encroachment upon our liberties. It’s been going on for decades. The idea that the right are the new advocates of freedom of speech is plain farcical.

Current Affairs · 01. May 2019
The future looks grim. Social media is becoming PC only. Self-censorship sucks nearly as much as moderator’s censorship. Only Tommy Robinson’s Twitter account gave us the chance to directly address the pathetic, dribbling excuse of a man himself… in anyway we wanted. Only Twitter gave us the freedom to have a battle of wits, with the heavy guns and the unarmed alike.

Current Affairs · 18. April 2019
Knuckle-dragging rednecks, college campus jocks and Twitter trolls: the alt-right increasingly resembles Mel Brook's raggle taggle army of hoodlums.

Current Affairs · 01. January 2019
While we bicker about the blue and red of our cola packaging, politian's purple ties or how much the reds are paying Facebook to help swing U.S. elections, we are distracted from far shadier behind-the-scenes dealings.

Current Affairs · 19. December 2018
IMF's brutal austerity programs not enough? Get ready for more cash creation and the subsequent inflation that will impoverish - not empower - the poor of the planet.

Current Affairs · 29. October 2018
Cut the hypocritical bull. All wealthy nations got rich with tariffs. In the U.S. expansion period, Washington, Jefferson, Hamilton, Lincoln, Jackson and Franklin were some of the most protectionist policy makers in history.

Current Affairs · 28. May 2018
Sweden and Switzerland bear many uncanny similarities: populations virtually identical GDPs and, logically analogous GDP per capita); Switzerland has a free-floating Franc, while Sweden’s currency is technically a managed float. Likewise, the two share diversified economies with similar principal industries and exports. So what's the big difference?